1. 12:01 27th Aug 2014

    Notes: 15

    Reblogged from kmagazinelovers

    Tags: menswearkim kibumkey

    image: Download

    kmagazinelovers:

SHINee - Chapter 1.Dream Girl - The Misconceptions of You

    kmagazinelovers:

    SHINee - Chapter 1.Dream Girl - The Misconceptions of You

     
  2. image: Download

    
Xiao Wen Ju, Vogue China March 2012

    Xiao Wen Ju, Vogue China March 2012

     
  3.  
  4. 22:22 24th Aug 2014

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from vogueanon

    Tags: plus sizefatshion

    image: Download

    vogueanon:

CATCH UP WITH THE FASHION ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

One Problem With Plus-Size Fashion: Customers Aren’t Buying It: This sentiment appeared on the opinion segment on TIME is a response to a plus-size blogger’s boycott for Target x Altuzarra. Garnerstyle who decided to stop shopping from Target (not only the retail section) reasons that the designs also should have been made for women who are over size 16. One problem with the blogger who penned the sentiment is that she doesn’t give statistics as to the number of plus-size women shopping at Target’s retail section. As far as Google lets me or anyone knows, there is not a report sheet on the demographics of clientele base. Therefore, the argument that plus-size women aren’t buying designer clothing and that accounts for the fact that designers and retailers aren’t considering to make size 16+ samples is pretty lacking in evidence. A spokesperson promised that there’ll be a plus-size collection coming up soon – it’ll be even better if there was a legitimate demographics of retail shoppers released as well.


I worked at Target for about 2 years or so in college and none of the designer-branded collections ever had any pieces larger than a size 12, as far as I can remember. Target’s problem with plus-size clothes seems to be the same as every other Main Street retailer: the tiny selection of clothes they do have never get bought because they’re frumpy and unflattering, the sales figures go down so the stores allocate less and less store for plus-size clothing, and the customers have a smaller selection and are thus less likely to buy. It’s a vicious cycle with a seemingly simple solution (i.e. design stuff for plus sizes that isn’t complete ugly shit,) but nobody wants to lower their brand profile by catering to larger people. 

    vogueanon:

    CATCH UP WITH THE FASHION ARTICLES OF THE WEEK

    One Problem With Plus-Size Fashion: Customers Aren’t Buying It: This sentiment appeared on the opinion segment on TIME is a response to a plus-size blogger’s boycott for Target x Altuzarra. Garnerstyle who decided to stop shopping from Target (not only the retail section) reasons that the designs also should have been made for women who are over size 16. One problem with the blogger who penned the sentiment is that she doesn’t give statistics as to the number of plus-size women shopping at Target’s retail section. As far as Google lets me or anyone knows, there is not a report sheet on the demographics of clientele base. Therefore, the argument that plus-size women aren’t buying designer clothing and that accounts for the fact that designers and retailers aren’t considering to make size 16+ samples is pretty lacking in evidence. A spokesperson promised that there’ll be a plus-size collection coming up soon – it’ll be even better if there was a legitimate demographics of retail shoppers released as well.

    I worked at Target for about 2 years or so in college and none of the designer-branded collections ever had any pieces larger than a size 12, as far as I can remember. Target’s problem with plus-size clothes seems to be the same as every other Main Street retailer: the tiny selection of clothes they do have never get bought because they’re frumpy and unflattering, the sales figures go down so the stores allocate less and less store for plus-size clothing, and the customers have a smaller selection and are thus less likely to buy. It’s a vicious cycle with a seemingly simple solution (i.e. design stuff for plus sizes that isn’t complete ugly shit,) but nobody wants to lower their brand profile by catering to larger people. 

     
  5. (Source: ridsnap.com)

     
  6. vintagesalt:

Beetlejuice (1988)

    vintagesalt:

    Beetlejuice (1988)

     
  7. 08:01

    Notes: 127572

    Reblogged from mintjaan

    Tags: kawaii

    actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

    actualbloggerwangyao:

    alvaroandtheworld:

    ultrafacts:

    Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

    THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

    No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

    And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

    So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

     
  8. prettyarbitrary:

    nuedvixx:

    blusterousiris:

    Robyn Lawley, Jada Sezer, and Gabi Gregg for Swimsuits For All. 

    😻😻

    Now THIS is how you sell a fucking bikini.

     
  9. 19:55 22nd Aug 2014

    Notes: 6

    Reblogged from vogueanon

    coutugh:

    If you think normcore is an actual trend you are free to remove my url from your browser history

     
  10. lebornaciar:

    gods for the modern agebaron samedi

    laugh in the face of death. treat life like a carnival—chase girls, smoke cigars, drink yourself blind, and never pass up the chance for a dirty joke. keep the dead in the ground and the dying from harm’s reach. save lives, lift curses, hand out favours and come back to collect—and smile, smile as you dig the graves of those who wrong you.

     
  11. image: Download

    tiny-librarian:

A lovely behind the scenes shot of Rose Bryne as the Duchesse de Polignac, though I can’t seem to place the gown she’s wearing here.
Source

    tiny-librarian:

    A lovely behind the scenes shot of Rose Bryne as the Duchesse de Polignac, though I can’t seem to place the gown she’s wearing here.

    Source

     
  12. 08:01

    Notes: 404

    Reblogged from fuckyeahladygaga

    Tags: lady gagagoth

    image: Download

     
  13. image: Download

     
  14. she-is-like-no-other:

     The Histoire de Curbes, Pulp Fashion Week Show(lle-de-France, France)

    (Source: planetofthickbeautifulwomen)

     
  15. thechanelmuse:

    Meet Cory Nieves. He’s a dapper, 10-year old CEO of Mr. Cory’s Cookies who started his own booming cookie business in an effort to help his mom buy a car after moving from NYC to New Jersey in 2009.